Sharpening Your Clinically Integrated Network

Health system clients are asking HSG a different set of network planning questions in the face of today’s market challenges.  Focus has shifted to building a network that can effectively address the world of Value-Based Care.  Four core questions have emerged:

What mix of providers are needed to deliver care to populations and how do we distribute them to most efficiently meet access and cost management needs?  While the question focuses on primary care, medical specialties involved in the care of costly chronic conditions are also crucial.  An understanding of the health issues of geographic submarkets plays a key role in these considerations.

How can we best utilize Advanced Practitioners?  Questions center around role definitions, advanced practitioners interactions with physicians, how APs can enhance the network’s productivity, and the specialties in which they can be most effective in improving access and quality of care.  Clearly, there is a primary care role, but there is a growing list of specialty practices in which AP’s fill the roles of clinician, patient educator, care manager and nurse navigator.  Developing your approach to incorporating AP’s presents opportunity for in-depth discussion and solidifying the clinical teams you’ll need.

How do we determine who to include in our post-acute network?  A growing body of data is available to help understand which post-acute providers do the best job.  Which providers are better able to help reduce readmissions?  Produce better outcomes?  Assist in improving patient compliance?  HSG has the data to help you develop the post-acute network for maximal efficiency.

How do we integrate network development with the needs of our hospitals?  While the demands of population health management are significant drivers of network development, viewing development from that perspective alone may not adequately address the ongoing patient care and coverage needs of your hospitals.  HSG works with clients to reconcile what can be competing demands into a single, comprehensive plan.